Archives For Dot Brand

This week, a few members of the FairWinds team are off in London to meet with some clients and friends across the pond. Of course, no matter where we are, we’ve always got new gTLDs on the brain. That’s why this picture (below) got us thinking: Continue Reading…

Here at FairWinds, we take a lot of pride in the services we offer clients around new gTLDs. But traditionally, our services have focused on domain names in existing gTLDs – specifically, advising clients on the best ways to use domains to promote and protect their brands online. This is the major underlying mission of the work we do. That’s why we found it so amusing when we noticed that cybersquatters had begun registering domain names referencing brands’ new gTLD applications. Call it meta-cybersquatting, if you will, squatting on domains that are about…domains. Continue Reading…

.UHOH

FairWinds Partners —  June 29, 2012

With the Public Meeting in Prague taking place less than two weeks after ICANN’s big reveal of the 1,930 new gTLD applications, it’s no surprise that certain applications and applicants were discussed openly during various sessions. For example, during the Public Forum on Thursday afternoon, a 14-year-old boy and a 16-year-old girl from China (ICANN’s youngest participants ever?) stepped up to the open microphone to express her support for an open, unrestricted .KIDS gTLD. Continue Reading…

.FAIRWINDS

FairWinds Partners —  June 13, 2012

Today, the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) posted the complete list of new gTLD applicants and what they applied for. While Reveal Day is, understandably, an important and long-anticipated day, the day the Internet really began to change was June 20, 2011, when ICANN’s Board voted to approve the New gTLD Program. It was on that day that brand owners had to begin to truly consider applying for new gTLDs, weighing the potential opportunity for innovation against the risk of being left behind, should these new extensions catch on. Continue Reading…

A few weeks ago, we reported on the new batching process that ICANN had proposed that revolved around giving applications a “secondary time stamp.” As of last week, the ICANN Board has approved the system for new gTLD applicants.

You can read about the details of the process, which ICANN has likened to “digital archery” (although “digital whack-a-mole” might be a more apt analogy), in our post, or on ICANN’s New gTLD Program site. But rather than rehash the mechanics of the process, today we’d like to discuss some of its implications. Continue Reading…

Any business that has undergone a domain name migration can tell you, there are some significant headaches involved. One of the biggest worries when switching to a new domain is preserving search engine rankings. There is an entire industry devoted to Search Engine Optimization, or SEO, and many companies invest significantly in the tools and tricks to make sure that their sites appear at the top of search engine query results.

With new gTLDs taking the stage over the next few years, businesses will be faced with the decision of whether to simply use new gTLD domains (dot brand or others) as vanity or marketing URLs for specific campaigns, or to sell the proverbial farm and migrate their sites completely from their old .COM or ccTLD domains to their new gTLD domains. Continue Reading…

A Note on Stats

FairWinds Partners —  March 21, 2012

Perhaps it is because there has been so little information out of ICANN about the field of new gTLD applicants that the media seem to be giving TAS registration numbers so much attention. ICANN has been publishing the number of applicants registered in its TLD Application System, or TAS, at regular intervals during the application period; as of last week, the number had topped 250. Each time this data point is published, certain members of the media tend to jump on it, attempting to extract some insight into how many applications that will ultimately translate to. Continue Reading…

People sometimes wonder why ICANN hosts three public meetings annually, and in such varied geographical locations (this year’s meetings will start in Costa Rica, move to Prague, and then end in Toronto). While outsiders may regard these meetings as somewhat excessive, the truth is, much of ICANN’s “work” – discussing issues, developing policies, and even voting to approve or reject those policies – takes place at these meetings. Continue Reading…

We were not expecting very much new gTLD news to come out of ICANN’s public meeting in Costa Rica, which opened this weekend. But it appears that ICANN has settled on a solution – or maybe it’s better just to say “process” – for dealing with new gTLD application batching.

In our post “Working on Batches,” we described how the New gTLD Applicant Guidebook includes a provision that if ICANN receives more than 500 new gTLD applications, then applications will be processed in “batches.” The first batch will consist of 500 applications, and subsequent batches will consist of 400 applications apiece. This batching process is designed to allow the third-party evaluator that ICANN hired to process applications to handle any extended evaluations, string contentions, or any other issues that may arise without overwhelming its capacity. Continue Reading…

In the fall, we wrote a “State of Play” blog post to give readers an idea of what the field of new gTLD applicants would look like once the application period opened. Well, now that we are about halfway through the application period, which will remain open for just under six weeks, it’s high time we provided readers with an update. Continue Reading…