Archives For ICANN

It’s no secret that ICANN can be a tricky organization to deal with. The technical terminology and acronyms alone are enough to trip anyone up. But what about the constantly changing list of dates and deadlines?

First, there was the hard cutoff for the new gTLD application period. Anyone who wishes to apply for a new gTLD must submit a complete application, along with the complete application fee, by 11:59 pm UTC on April 12, 2012. We have known about this deadline for quite some time now. Continue Reading…

The day has finally arrived. The new gTLD application period is officially open, and as a special treat to mark the occasion, ICANN has dropped a new version of the New gTLD Applicant Guidebook. This marks the eighth iteration of the Guidebook and, as with earlier updated versions, ICANN has also published a document that summarizes the changes, alongside documentation to justify its reasons for making those changes. The PDF version is available here. In this post, we’ll discuss the changes that will have the most impact on businesses planning to apply for gTLDs. Continue Reading…

Last Wednesday we posted that we had received indication from ICANN’s new gTLD Customer Support Center that there would be a new Applicant Guidebook coming out. Unfortunately, at that time, we could not say when that new Guidebook would be published. Now, after some digging around ICANN’s website, we at least know when the new version should be ready: Wednesday, January 11. Continue Reading…

Strickling Speaks Out

FairWinds Partners —  January 5, 2012

Earlier this week, National Telecommunications and Information Administration Assistant Secretary for Communications and Information Lawrence Strickling sent a letter to ICANN Chairman Steve Crocker urging ICANN to consider implementing certain measures in regards to the New gTLD Program. Those suggestions are as follows: Continue Reading…

Late Hit

FairWinds Partners —  January 4, 2012

Today is Wednesday, January 4, 2012: T-minus 8 days until the new gTLD application period opens next Thursday. While applicants will have a full three months to submit their applications, some are working diligently this week to ensure that their applications are fully prepared to submit on January 12.

So you can understand our surprise when we found out yesterday that ICANN plans to release a new version of the New gTLD Applicant Guidebook. Continue Reading…

ICANN Clarifies COI

FairWinds Partners —  December 28, 2011

What are the odds that the same week we decide to run a series about the financial aspects of applying for and running a new gTLD, ICANN publishes a set of guidelines for the Continued Operations Instrument (COI)? Maybe it’s because the COI is a question that has been on the minds of almost every applicant we’ve talked to. Or maybe we should chalk it up to a holiday miracle.

Either way, in an announcement published Friday, ICANN listed its estimations of what it will cost to cover critical registry functions for three years for various numbers of domain names. Here are those cost guidelines: Continue Reading…

This post is the final installment of last week’s gTLD finance series. Today, we’re going to talk about tips to answer ICANN’s Financial Capability questions.

In keeping with its “one-size-fits-all” approach, ICANN designed the scoring system of the gTLD application to ensure that only established entities that with the technical and monetary wherewithal to operate a gTLD registry will be awarded extensions. Continue Reading…

This week here on the gTLD Strategy blog, we’re going to be talking finance. Specifically, we’ll be breaking down the costs of applying for and operating a new gTLD, the application questions that deal with finances, and a little thing called the Continuing Operations Instrument (COI). Today, we’re going to discuss the COI and the options applicants have available to them.

As we mentioned in yesterday’s post, the Applicant Guidebook requires all applicants to submit the same information, regardless of whether they are multinational corporations with billions of dollars in revenue, or globetrotting groups of entrepreneurs scrambling to find investors willing to back their .IDEA. Continue Reading…

This week here on the gTLD Strategy blog, we’re going to be talking finance. Specifically, we’ll be breaking down the costs of applying for and operating a new gTLD, the application questions that deal with finances, and a little thing called the Continued Operations Instrument. Today, we’re going to get started with the cost breakdown.

At this point, it’s common knowledge that it costs a cool $185,000 to apply for a new gTLD. But what exactly does that sum cover? Essentially, it amounts to a “pay-to-play” filing charge, and it is really just the cover charge applicants will have to pay to get into the new gTLD club. If the application faces complications like String Contention, any kinds of objections or Extended Valuation, that amount will creep up. Continue Reading…

Working on Batches

FairWinds Partners —  December 16, 2011

In the New gTLD Applicant Guidebook, there is a provision that if ICANN receives more than 500 new gTLD applications, then applications will be processed in “batches.” The first batch will consist of 500 applications, and subsequent batches will consist of 400 applications apiece. This batching process is designed to allow the third-party evaluator that ICANN hires to process applications to handle any extended evaluations, string contentions, or any other issues that may arise without overwhelming its capacity. Continue Reading…