Archives For New gTLD Applicant Guidebook

Last Wednesday we posted that we had received indication from ICANN’s new gTLD Customer Support Center that there would be a new Applicant Guidebook coming out. Unfortunately, at that time, we could not say when that new Guidebook would be published. Now, after some digging around ICANN’s website, we at least know when the new version should be ready: Wednesday, January 11. Continue Reading…

Late Hit

FairWinds Partners —  January 4, 2012

Today is Wednesday, January 4, 2012: T-minus 8 days until the new gTLD application period opens next Thursday. While applicants will have a full three months to submit their applications, some are working diligently this week to ensure that their applications are fully prepared to submit on January 12.

So you can understand our surprise when we found out yesterday that ICANN plans to release a new version of the New gTLD Applicant Guidebook. Continue Reading…

This week here on the gTLD Strategy blog, we’re going to be talking finance. Specifically, we’ll be breaking down the costs of applying for and operating a new gTLD, the application questions that deal with finances, and a little thing called the Continued Operations Instrument. Today, we’re going to get started with the cost breakdown.

At this point, it’s common knowledge that it costs a cool $185,000 to apply for a new gTLD. But what exactly does that sum cover? Essentially, it amounts to a “pay-to-play” filing charge, and it is really just the cover charge applicants will have to pay to get into the new gTLD club. If the application faces complications like String Contention, any kinds of objections or Extended Valuation, that amount will creep up. Continue Reading…

It’s time to talk about Question 18. We’ve alluded to it, hinted at it and even warned about it before here on gTLD Strategy, but now, with just over a month until the application period opens, it’s time to roll up our sleeves and dig into Question 18 of the New gTLD Applicant Guidebook.

Question 18, or the “Mission/Purpose” question, is all about how applicants plan to use their new gTLD. Applicants must address the following three sub-questions: Continue Reading…

A few weeks ago, we blogged about ICANN’s recent reluctance to own up to its role as an advocate of new gTLDs (according to statements by CEO Rod Beckstrom, the organization is just educating people about the new extensions). But over the past few months, as we here at FairWinds have been studying the New gTLD Applicant Guidebook inside and out, we’ve noticed a few other instances where ICANN seems to be trying to evade responsibility when it comes to new gTLDs. Continue Reading…

This is the second post in a two-part series of blog posts explaining String Contention Sets, a complex aspect of ICANN’s new gTLD evaluation process.

So you’ve found yourself in a String Contention Set. Another party has applied for the same new gTLD as you, or one that is so visually similar that ICANN believes that allowing both strings to become full-fledged new gTLDs will cause confusion among Internet users.

Let’s assume that the Contention Set consists of you and one other applicant. What happens now? First, ICANN encourages you both to reach an agreement amongst yourselves as to which application will proceed. Both of you can choose to drop out at this point, or one can concede to the other, but there is no way that both applications can proceed with each of you operating a separate registry. Continue Reading…

This is the first post in a two-part series of blog posts explaining String Contention Sets, a complex aspect of ICANN’s new gTLD evaluation process.

When the news about the New gTLD Program first broke, before details about the application process and trademark protection mechanisms were widely discussed, many assumed that ICANN would be doling out new top-level domains to the highest bidders through a series of auctions.

Of course, we all know that’s not really the case – in reality, there is only one scenario where two or more gTLD applicants would end up in an auction over an extension, or “string,” as ICANN refers to it. That scenario is if applicants end up in a String Contention Set. Continue Reading…